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Utorak, 01 Juni 2021 10:24

The influence of the Laocoön and His Sons on Michelangelo's work Istaknut

Minos, Judge of the Underworld in The Last Judgement by Michelangelo Minos, Judge of the Underworld in The Last Judgement by Michelangelo

The sculpture Laocoön and His Sons, also called the Laocoön Group, was unearthed in a vineyard on the Esquiline Hill near Roman Emperor Nero's Domus Aurea complex and the Colosseum in 1506. This discovery made a great impression on Italian artists and continued to influence Italian art into the Baroque period. 31-year old Michelangelo, who was working for newly elected Pope Julius II, and his arch-rival Giuliano da Sangallo were called in to take a look and give their opinion. The young Michelangelo immediately recognized and admired the quality of the sculpture convincing Pope Julius II to buy it for the expanding Papal art collection.

Michelangelo has been impressed by the massive scale of the work and its sensuous Hellenistic aesthetic, particularly its depiction of male figures. The sculpture Laocoön and His Sons had a profound effect on the development of Michelangelo's style. Its influence, as well as the Belvedere Torso, is evidenced in many of Michelangelo's sculptures, such as the Rebellious Slave and the Dying Slave sculpted for the tomb of Pope Julius II, both of which are restrained and encircled by straps around their naked bodies.

Art historians have suggested that there are references to the sculpture Laocoön and His Sons in the Sistine Chapel. Several of the nude males and the figure of Haman in the Sistine Chapel ceiling draw on the figures Michelangelo adapted the form and type of the Laocoön and His Sons for the central Christ group in the Last Judgment. Minos, the Judge of the Underworld in the Last Judgement has a snake provocatively wrapped around him.

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